Poetry in the News

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Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Cartys Poetry Journal: call for submissions, books2review

Poets seeking to have their books reviewed in the Cartys Poetry Journal are invited to submit a copy to us at the address below. In keeping with our eco-freindly ethos, e-books are also welcomed, to this address. CD's of readings are also welcome, and email us your website links if you want us to feature same.

Submissions, as always, are welcome, please indicate in the subject line which listserv (Poetics List via Poets and Writers Picnic) you are replying from to help us see which ones are working, and which not and so forth.


Email submissions to Tomás Ó Cárthaigh, tomasocarthaigh@yahoo.com

http://www.cartyspoetryjournal.com is the website of our ezine, with a forthcoming edition due inside the next week, delayed this time due to a late submission that is being translated from Lithuanian to English.

Feel free to share our site online!

Tomás Ó Cárthaigh 
Thomas Carty, 13 Church Street, Tullamore, Co. Offaly


PS: Do you haiku? http://lishanu.com/ has just published issue 2 of its ezine of Haiku in different languages from around the world. The brainchild of Norman Darlington, submission guidelines are on the website as is the maden issue.

Saturday, June 25, 2011

Harriet Talks Poetry To Strangers

Harriet writes about the The Week We Talked To Strangers. Interviews with poets that is to say, and "she" is the Poetry Foundation staff blog. This is to test drive our dear (rss that is) reader's expanded send feature for blogging through without detours. Normally, I (forget the editorial "we" - just one of me, alternate personae not to count) would clip and send you to the link to finish reading. This post, however, is a link collection already directing you ot other pages. More later about plans and editorial rearrangings on Virtual Picnic, the moveable feast for poets and writers. Now onward with reading and clicking through...





Who says people don’t know how to communicate anymore? Not us – we’re too busy listening! Two obvious highlights this week on Harriet were our two killer interviews: A long, revealing chat with the braintrust behind Lost & Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative and Garret Caples’s freewheeling rap session with two Bay Area self-publishers on the micro and the macro of their craft. Never let it be said that Harriet isn’t an A-list listener.

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Poetry and People’s History: Places We Called Home | Working-Class Perspectives

Who would have considered Working-Class Perspectives, a blog from the Center for Working-Class Studies, a poetry source or the Center as a patron of poets on its blog and via the Tillie Olsen Prize from the Working-Class Studies Association. After Facebook-sharing the blog post with John Crawford (West End Press), I decided, in the spirit of the WE Press, Bertolt Brecht (worth a post of his own) and Urban Verbs, to plog it too. Bryner in particular should resonate for Mountainair
Poetry is not everyone’s cup of tea, I know. Modernist poetry in particular has a reputation for being obscure and self-obsessed. But there is also a vein of contemporary poetry that speaks powerfully to our condition as a society, and much of it in recent decades has come from a working-class rather than an elite perspective.

Jeanne Bryner    No Matter How Many Windows

Jim Daniels (From Milltown to Malltown) and Jeanne Bryner (No Matter How Many Windows) are exemplary writers whose poetry is rooted in the everyday experience of working people and written in ways most of us can appreciate. They convey the clear vision, emotional connections, and truth-telling that good poetry offers. And in their most recent books they illuminate local and personal histories of the times we are living through.

Monday, June 13, 2011

Announcing The Mad Hatters' Review Blog

Mad Hatters’ Review is an online journal with a collaborative spirit that caters to an international audience with an appreciation for wit, whimsy, dark humor, satire, lyricism, rhythm, word play and post postmodern post avant-garde literature, art, music, politics, films, columns, book reviews, interviews, scratch n sniff projects, collages, literary audios, etc. 




We at MHR see the Mad Hatters’ Review Blog as a gathering place for courtiers of spoken and unspoken words,  inventive images and music, and of course, the mad at heart, to stay informed and invigorated.

Friday, June 10, 2011

It's Duende time again

~ Sun Jun12, 3-5pm, Anasazi Fields, Placitas #NMpoetry with Bill Pearlman and Marilyn Stablein. For more details on series and featured poets, view, print or download pdf flyer online, also available at Local Poets Guild

click for larger view


The Duende Poetry Series (which really should have its own page if only a quickie setup on Facebook) puts on four poetry readings a year, one each season of the year, for the benefit of the community of Placitas and open to the general public. For information, contact Jim Fish 867-3062 or online at the Anasazi Fields website

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

A moveable feast

Shaffer gazebo

This digression (moveable text) started out as a descriptive "what is the Picnic" sidebar note. A briefer version may return there when the hosting widget co-operates.  You will note I have replaced the traditional, perhaps even iconic, Picnic image of the Shaffer Gazebo in the sidebar with an another picnic image, Monet's Déjeuner sur l'herbe.  That one too will be replaced by another picnic related image, another in a changing gallery of picnics signaling the Picnic blog's change of course. At Picnic chez Facebook, I changed the profile picture from performers at the gazebo to picnickers on the grass

Poets & Writers Picnic = poets, writers, readers, listeners. Once upon a time (not so long ago, just last summer) IRL (In Real Life) that meant convening annually at the Shaffer Hotel in Mountainair NM in the dog days of August (shades of Pope and Juvenal) for a day of spoken word under the tall trees shading the Shaffer courtyard. Now our picnic is virtual, a moveable feast... where we'll go, nobody knows. Come along ~ accept Picnic's "invitation au voyage."


Still associated with Mountainair, Picnic is no longer anchored (or beholden) to a specific event (Sunflower Festival), institutions (arts council) or locations (Shaffer Hotel). Mixing metaphors as we go, we can raise anchor and set out for any destination. Call Mountainar or just New Mexico our home port.


"Moveable feast," whether holy day or Hemingway suits picnics: what feasts could be more moveable? In the figurative context of literary and other symbolic picnics, symposia, banquets and other feasts, rich in allusions and connections, "Picnic" may no longer grace the gazebo in the dog days of August but remains our trope of choice and controlling metaphor.


Paraphrasing Hemingway, "wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for poetry is a moveable feast."


Mountainair Poets and Writers Picnic
picnickers at a past PWP, 
photo by Robin DesJardins, Imagio Studios

Thursday, June 2, 2011

Catching up on #NMPoetry

~ with the help of the Local Poets Guild newsletter. If you don't already subscribe, get thee hence to the Local Poets Guild Google Group and rectify the oversight. Don't expect me to repost it for your convenience indefinitely when a click will get it in your mailbox



After a week more off line than not. I'm still behind but at least have been tending @PWPicnic and Facebook Picnickery, both faster than blogging. I'm still sorting which to use how. Some redundancy is useful but too much becomes being annoyingly excessive, not to mention time consuming unless automated by clever software. Both platforms are better suited to event announcements and reminders, especially with recent FB changes to share options.

FB posts auto-tweet on @PWPicnic. Vice versa too although not always consistently. I try to remember to add #nmpoetry hashtag to NM poetry posts, tweets, RTs and links for easy searching and enhanced NM poetry web presence. Plus I'm looking for Virtual Picnic space to stake out, not wheels to reinvent.


So what do I do right after saying I'm moving event announcement to social media? Post a newsletter chock-a-block with events. Inconsistent? Maybe, but let's just call it catching up for now with more to come on the subject. Comments and suggestions invited...


 ... and now I turn the floor or rather page (or screen) over to Lisa Gill


Dear Poets and Friends, 
Our big featured reading this month is Triptych on June 9th with the extraordinary Jasmine Cuffee who will be performing along side Sari Krosinsky, who has just had a book picked up for publication, and Sarah McKinstry-Brown, who is back to visit from Nebraska. A stellar line-up. We also have a workshop for "writing for nonviolence" with Stewart Warren, our usual Monday night East of Edith open mics, and another P(EAR) craft talk with a poet who has just moved to town, John Survivor Blake. (I'll be speaking then also.) And if you are interested in a workshop with Sarah McKinstry-Brown, reserve a spot by writing localpoetsguild@yahoo.com . It'll be this Sunday afternoon at 2:00 pm, if there's enough interest to make it happen. I also will need to send directions before the class, so be in touch. For now I'm trying to make all of our events run on a donation, sliding scale, pass the hat kind of basis. We appreciate your support and will try to keep things accessible.
So here goes the details of what's up this June from the Local Poets Guild.
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